Melissa Hassard

2013/2014 WWOT Events Calendar & Readings

Melissa Hassard:

WWOT Fall/Spring Poetry Readings & Open Mic! Check out the incredible line-up.

Originally posted on :

What has Al Maginnes, Jim Clark, Richard Krawiec, Howard Lemuel Craft, Celisa Steele, Sarah Lindsay, Anna Weaver, Benjamin Molini, Crystal Simone Smith, Terri Kirby Erickson, Helen Losse, and more?

The fall/spring season of readings at Tate Street Coffee House. To say we’re…

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Jul 19
2013/2014 WWOT Events Calendar & Readings

What has Al Maginnes, Jim Clark, Richard Krawiec, Howard Lemuel Craft, Celisa Steele, Sarah Lindsay, Anna Weaver, Benjamin Molini, Crystal Simone Smith, Terri Kirby Erickson, Helen Losse, and more?

The fall/spring season of readings at Tate Street Coffee House. To say we’re excited is an understatement. Mark your calendars and get ready to join us, starting with August and musician Russell…

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Jul 19
2013/2014 WWOT Events Calendar & Readings
laurajwryan:

The Fading Bloom, Peony, 6/14/2014
Jul 18

laurajwryan:

The Fading Bloom, Peony, 6/14/2014

"How many poetries are there; how many could there be? The poetry of investigation, the poetry of protest, personal poetry, national poetry, international poetry, documentary poetry, poetry of war and peace, emotional, environmental, philosophical, identity poetry. And what’s at the root of all these poetries, if anything? Poetry as a way of approaching the world — as the urgent effort — probably futile — to get at something inside or outside through language — or to escape into language as a way to survive a brutal material or psychological world. Somehow language — the effort in the ineffability of words — can save us if we can engage at a deep enough level to get past the pain. That’s then a poem and more than a poem. It’s a mode of living. What we call a poem might not be more than a momentary snapshot of an ongoing life in language — a dislocation, an exile.

Thoughts on Ijele, by Uche Nduka (Essay by Norman Fischer)
Overpass Books 2012, $10, ISBN 978-0-9832206-2-6

(via Poetry as path, as weapon | Jacket2)
Jul 18

"How many poetries are there; how many could there be? The poetry of investigation, the poetry of protest, personal poetry, national poetry, international poetry, documentary poetry, poetry of war and peace, emotional, environmental, philosophical, identity poetry. And what’s at the root of all these poetries, if anything? Poetry as a way of approaching the world — as the urgent effort — probably futile — to get at something inside or outside through language — or to escape into language as a way to survive a brutal material or psychological world. Somehow language — the effort in the ineffability of words — can save us if we can engage at a deep enough level to get past the pain. That’s then a poem and more than a poem. It’s a mode of living. What we call a poem might not be more than a momentary snapshot of an ongoing life in language — a dislocation, an exile.

Thoughts on Ijele, by Uche Nduka (Essay by Norman Fischer)
Overpass Books 2012, $10, ISBN 978-0-9832206-2-6

(via Poetry as path, as weapon | Jacket2)

(via 17 Bookstores That Will Make You Want to Go There)
Jul 11

(via 17 Bookstores That Will Make You Want to Go There)

(via 30 Magical Photos Of Children Playing Around The World | True Activist)
Jul 8

(via 30 Magical Photos Of Children Playing Around The World | True Activist)

Stumbled across this link today and realized this is the first time I’ve seen the online version of this interview I gave back in April.  I appreciate the People’s Tribune and their commitment in sharing the story of Moral Monday.  Thought I’d share:

 

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Jul 5
Interview over at the People’s Tribune

June Monthly Meeting! This Sunday, June 8

Join us Sunday, June 8, 3:00pm-5:00pm at Deep Roots Market, for our June monthly meeting with special guests Anora McGaha and Kerry Holjes.  Anora is founder of Women Writers, Women Books and When Women Waken.  Kerry is managing editor of WWW, and will be here to tell you about what they’re working on, as well as publishing opportunities.

Come and spend some time connecting with these women and…

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Jun 2
June Monthly Meeting! This Sunday, June 8
(via Eudora Welty to The New Yorker— The best job application ever)
May 27

(via Eudora Welty to The New Yorker— The best job application ever)

I am thrilled to share with you that my poem, At the End, won Honorary Mention in the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition, from the North Carolina Writers’ Network.  This year’s judge was Jillian Weise.  I am humbled and honored to find myself in the company of the esteemed winning poets:

Alan Michael Parker of Davidson is the winner of the 2014 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition for his poem,…

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May 9
Honorary Mention | Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition
May 5

sandandglass:

President Barack Obama at the White House Correpondents’ Dinner. 

(via recycledstars)

"What’s interesting is that once again, like with Paula Deen, America is captured by an individual white person who says really racist things and kind of conveniently overlooks their actually racist acts. Donald Sterling had been known to be a perpetrator of housing discrimination. But not many people cared about that. But once he said no Black people at his games… that was when everybody got mad! Or at least pretended to. Why is that? America is a lot more concerned with appearing post-racial than actually being post-racial. Time and time again racist acts are ignored and swept under the rug. But every once in awhile a white person will be publicly dragged for saying something very racist. That’s the unspoken rule in American race relations: you can be racist but don’t sound racist. You can treat people of color horribly, but you can’t verbally express that you want to treat them horribly. That is crossing the line in America. This isn’t 1965 anymore. So every once in awhile a high profile white person forgets that we’re in “post-racial” America and that saying racist things is not okay and they become the white guilt scapegoat for the season. The white liberals condemn them and the white conservatives halfheartedly defend them on the basis of “free speech” and whatever other excuse. And white America sighs and says, look, we’re not racist! Meanwhile Black players are still akin to slaves within an elaborate and lucrative plantation system. Meanwhile Black people in general are facing exacerbated economic barriers due to race so that they can’t be at many of these games anyway, even if they wanted to. Meanwhile there are Black and Latino families being denied housing. Meanwhile, in Paula Deen’s case, Black workers are still being under-paid and unacknowledged for the recipes they created."

- excerpt from “Donald Sterling Problem or American Race Problem?" @ One Black Girl. Many Words. 

(Source: daniellemertina, via omarindigo)

Apr 29

This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.

— Walt Whitman

Apr 13